Home Page
Low Graphics Version
About UsHarbor CommissionFinanceTradeEnvironmentCommunityContact UsHow Do I Find...
Home > News > News DetailsE-mail storyPrint friendly format

News Details


Port Building Earns 'Green' Certification

July 24, 2009

The Port of Long Beach Command and Control Center has become the first building in the harbor district – and just the third in the City of Long Beach – to earn a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, an internationally recognized set of "green" standards in building construction. The center was recently awarded LEED's Silver-level distinction.

 "The LEED certification of our security facility is yet another validation of the Port’s commitment to environmental stewardship," said Port Executive Director Richard D. Steinke. “And it’s just the first of many more to come. Under our Green Port Policy, all new terminal buildings and other facilities constructed in the Port will be designed to meet LEED standards.”

To earn a LEED certification, buildings must be designed and built to minimize their impact on the environment, such as the use of recycled construction materials and designs that maximize the use of natural light and cut down on electricity consumption. 

The Port of Long Beach Command and Control Center, which opened on February 9, 2009, is the third building in the City of Long Beach to earn LEED certification. The other two are the Mark Twain/MacArthur Park Branch Library on Anaheim Street and the Watershed Exhibit and Classroom at the Aquarium of the Pacific. The center serves as the Port's Security Division headquarters and as a coordination and communications hub for other agencies, including Customs and Border Protection, Long Beach Police Department, Port of Los Angeles, and Marine Exchange of Southern California.

The $21-million facility was built using the latest in green building technology. It features broad windows that allow in as much natural light as possible and sensor switches that only turn on electric lights when they detect movement. The carpeting is made from 30 to 40 percent recycled material. Outside, the pavement that surrounds the building is made from a permeable material that allows water to seep in, decreasing runoff water into storm drains and eventually the ocean.

All new buildings, including an administration complex now under construction at Pier G for International Transportation Service, will be designed to meet LEED standards.

About UsHarbor CommissionFinanceTradeEnvironmentCommunityContact UsHow Do I Find...
 Civica A Granicus Company